GO IN DEPTH

Space Objects

Space Objects By NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Introduction

Now that you have studied the differences between a planet and a dwarf planet and looked at how scientific knowledge is subject to modification as new information challenges prevailing theories, you should solidify your understanding of these concepts by looking at these images of planets and dwarf planets and deciding on how to classify them.


planet or dwarf planet?

You can either writer "Planet" or "Dwarf Planet" next to the image or you can cut out the images and group all the planets together and group all the dwarf planets together.

ceres
NASA, ESA, J. Parker (Southwest Research Institute), P. Thomas (Cornell University), and L. McFadden (University of Maryland, College Park)


Shares its orbital space with other bodies of similar size.

Mean Radius: 476.2 km

jupiter
NASA/JPL-Caltech


Gravitationally dominant

Mean Radius: 69,911 km

mercury
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington


Doesn't share its orbital space with other bodies of similar size

Mean Radius:  2,439.7 km

eris
NASA, ESA, and M. Brown


Not gravitationally dominant

Mean Radius: 1163 km

eris
A. Feild (Space Telescope Science Institute)


Shares its orbital space with other bodies of similar size.

Mean Radius: 620 km

neptune
NASA/JPL-Caltech


Doesn't share its orbital space with other bodies of similar size

Mean Radius: 24,622 km

earth
NASA


Gravitationally dominant

Mean Radius: 6,371.00 km

makemake
Ann Feild (Space Telescope Science Institute)


Not gravitationally dominant

Mean Radius: 715 km

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