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Researching an Endangered Species

Researching an Endangered Species

Introduction

Who does science? Students like you! How does science happen? It happens through careful fact finding, discussion, and experimentation. Today you will research an endangered species using your school library and the Internet. Work together as a research team to answer the questions on this sheet. 


Research

Group members

 

Date

 

Species

 

Species Information

Scientific Name

 

Native Location(s)

 

Native Environment (Habitat)

 

Why the species is endangered.

 

An interesting fact about the animal.

 

What sources (names) did you use?

 

 

 

Questions

What kind of habitat does the animal need to thrive?

 

Why is it endangered?

 

What are scientists doing to help?

 

How can other people help?

 

 

Presentation

Poster 

  • Include at least 5 images on the poster along with 5 pieces of information to go along with the images. The information can be done as captions for the images.
  • Be sure to also include a title and a list of your sources of information.
  • The images and information should correspond to the information you collected during your research: Scientific Name, Native Location, Native Environment (Habitat), Why the species is endangered, An interesting fact about the animal.

PowerPoint

  • Include at least 7 slides in the PowerPoint – one for each piece of information you collected plus a title slide and a final slide that lists your sources. You should include the information to go along with the images.
  • The images and information should correspond to the information you collected during your research: Scientific Name, Native Location, Native Environment (Habitat), Why the species is endangered, An interesting fact about the animal.

Scoring Rubric 

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Coverage of the Topic

Details on the poster or PowerPoint capture the important information about the topic and increase the audience’s understanding.

Details on the poster or PowerPoint include important information but the audience may need more information to understand fully.

Details on the poster or PowerPoint relate to the topic but are too general or incomplete. The audience needs more information to understand.

Details on the poster or PowerPoint have little or nothing to do with main topic.

Use of Graphics

All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand.

All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand.

All graphics relate to the topic.

Graphics do not relate to the topic.

Organization

Information is very organized with clear titles and captions.

Information is organized with titles and captions.

Information is organized, but titles and captions are missing or do not help the reader understand.

The information appears to be disorganized.

Layout and Design

All information on the poster or PowerPoint is in focus and can be easily viewed and identified from 6 ft. away.

Most of the information on the poster or PowerPoint is in focus and the content easily viewed and identified from 6 ft. away.

Most of the information on the poster or PowerPoint is in focus and the content is easily viewed and identified from 4 ft. away.

Much of the information on the poster or PowerPoint is unclear or too small.

Sources

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented.

All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but there are a few errors in the format.

All sources (information and graphics) are documented, but information is incomplete or many are not in the desired format.

Some sources are not accurately documented.

Mechanics

No grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Almost no grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors

A few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.

Presentation

The presentation did not seem hurried or too slow. The presenter spoke clearly and distinctly and established eye contact with the audience.

The presentation seemed slightly hurried or too slow. The presenter spoke clearly most of the time and established eye contact with the audience.

The presentation seemed very hurried or too slow. The presenter spoke clearly and distinctly only some of the time and/or established little eye contact with the audience.

The presenter did not speak clearly most of the time and established little eye contact with the audience.

 

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