GO IN DEPTH

Gravity Launch

Gravity Launch

Introduction

Use this sheet to keep track of your data from each mission.


 

As you try different combinations of thrust and angle, you may want to keep track
of what you have tried as well as any observations. You can do that below. When
you get a combination that works, write it in the Successful Missions! section near
the end of the student sheet.

Mission Attempts

Mission One
Attempts Thrust  Angle  Observations                                                                      
1      
2      
3      

 

Mission Two
Attempts Thrust  Angle  Observations                                                                      
1      
2      
3      

 

Stop here for discussion

Mission Three
Attempts Thrust  Angle  Observations                                                                      
1      
2      
3      



While in Mission 4, plug in the following numbers. They are not correct, but observe what happens and describe what you see under Observations.

Thrust: 7.5
Angle: 27.01

Mission Four
Attempts Thrust  Angle  Observations                                                                      
1      
2      
3      

 

Mission Five
Attempts Thrust  Angle  Observations                                                                      
1      
2      
3      

 

Successful Missions!
  Thrust                       
Angle                            
Mission 1
   
Mission 2    
Mission 3    
Mission 4    
Mission 5    



What did you learn?
When your teacher instructs you to, you will get into groups and do your own beanbag toss
while observing forces at work.

Once you are in your group, do the following:
With your classmates, find an area that gives you about five feet of throwing room. Make a
“target” by crisscrossing the tape on the floor.

Each person in your group will toss the beanbag three times to try to make the target. It’s o.k. if
some people in your group don’t hit the target exactly.

While you watch the other people in your group toss the bag, make the following observations.
Write two to five sentences to answer each question:

1.  What always happens to the beanbag, no matter how it is thrown?

 

 

2.  Why does this predictable “thing” always happen?

 

 

3.  Does earth need to touch the bag to pull it down?

 

 

4.  What is the force that gets the beanbag from your classmates’ hands into the air?

 

 

5.  When the force of the throw changes, does the motion of the beanbag change? Describe.

 

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AAAS