GO IN DEPTH

Videos for Grades 9-12

Videos for Grades 9-12 Photo Credit: Clipart.com
Here you'll find all the videos in the Science NetLinks collection aimed at high school students. Focused on topics as wide ranging as the mechanics of weightlifting and the art of the solar system, there is a video here for every student.
Filter Resources by Grade:

Videos

  • Stargazing Basics 2: Understanding Magnitudes

    9-12  |  Video
    This video is produced by the Eyes on the Sky. It explores how to understand the magnitude scale, starting with visible stars in the naked eye range, going up in brightness to understand the relative brightness of bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter and then the full Moon and Sun, and then heading back down the magnitude scale (but UP in numbers - all explained!) to dimmer objects.
  • Curiosity Has Landed

    6-12  |  Video
    Relive the nail-biting terror and joy as NASA's Curiosity rover successfully landed on Mars the night of Aug. 5, 2012, PDT (morning of Aug. 6 EDT).
  • Images of Our Solar System

    6-12  |  Video
    Artist Michael Benson and planetary scientist Dr. Nancy Chabot discuss the intersection of art and science at the opening of the Planetfall art exhibition.
  • Interview with Loree Griffin Burns

    3-12  |  Video
    This video features an interview with author Loree Griffin Burns at the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Malaria: blood, sweat, and tears

    6-12  |  Video
    Photojournalist Adam Nadel offers insights into his exhibition, "Malaria: blood, sweat, and tears," which was featured in the AAAS Gallery in 2012.
  • Nanomaterials

    9-12  |  Video
    In this segment of Material Marvels, Dr. Ainissa Ramirez demonstrates how materials behave strangely when they are nanosize—about 1/100,000 the thickness of your hair.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Designing a Fast Pool

    8-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. Through advances in pool design, engineers are helping swimmers reach their maximum speed with technology designed to minimize waves.
  • Climate Change Research in California (Part B)

    6-12  |  Video
    This video was made by Danielle Balistrieri, a college student who participated in grasslands research in California, and discusses the results of their research.
  • Citizen Scientists

    6-12  |  Video
    This video, from Science in Seconds, looks at what it means to be a citizen scientist.
  • 2011 BioBlitz BobCast 2: Endophytic Fungi

    K-12  |  Video
    In this video, AAAS's Bob Hirshon talks with a team from the University of Arizona who are hunting for fungi that spend their entire lives inside plants.
  • 2010 BioBlitz BobCast 5: Algae

    K-12  |  Video
    In this final BobCast video, we hear from a group of college students who collect and identify marine algae, better known as seaweed.
  • 2010 BioBlitz BobCast 3: Reef Trip

    K-12  |  Video
    AAAS's Bob Hirshon and a small team of volunteer “fish counters” head out on a boat trip to a turtlegrass bed and coral reef.
  • 2010 BioBlitz BobCast 1: Noon Arrival

    K-12  |  Video
    In the first of a series of live 2010 BioBlitz BobCasts, host Bob Hirshon arrives at the BioBlitz staging area and provides a short video tour of the people gathering there.
  • Brood II Is Back

    K-12  |  Video
    Bob Hirshon interviews Dr. Michael Raupp, an entomologist, about the 2013 emergence of the Brood ii 17-year periodical cicadas.
  • Science of a Tsunami

    6-12  |  Video
    Studying the science of tsunamis will hopefully provide better understanding and a better warning system
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Designing Safety Helmets

    7-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. A mechanical engineer at New York University's Polytechnic Institute explains how the safety helmets that Olympians wear are designed, constructed, and tested.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Engineering for Mobility

    8-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. A biomechanical engineer at the University of Pittsburgh demonstrates how engineering can help wheelchair athletes of all sports maximize their performance at the Paralympic Games.
  • The Last Speakers

    6-12  |  Video
    Clips from the documentary The Last Speakers share snippets of interviews with speakers of endangered languages.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: The Impact of Jenny Simpson

    6-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. U.S. runner Jenny Simpson relied on new treadmill technology to help rehabilitate from a stress fracture as she trained for the 2012 Summer Olympics.
  • The Science of the Deep Horizon Oil Spill

    6-12  |  Video
    John P. Holdren at the May 13, 2010 AAAS Forum on Science and Technology Policy discusses why scientists can't determine more precisely how much oil is gushing from the Deepwater Horizon rig.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: The Biomechanics of Usain Bolt

    9-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. It examines how Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt's stride, strength, and muscle coordination have helped him record the fastest time in the world in the 100 meter sprint.
  • Thermoelectrics

    9-12  |  Video
    In this segment of Material Marvels, Dr. Ainissa Ramirez describes how simple devices like cell phones can be powered by heat using thermoelectric materials, which convert heat to electricity.
  • Topspin Doctor: How Physics Serves Tennis

    3-12  |  Video
    In this segment of Science XPlained, Dr. Ainissa Ramirez discusses how the strings in a tennis racket--often made of synthetic or natural materials--make the important topspin shot possible.
  • What is a Watershed

    3-12  |  Video
    This video provides a brief explanation of a watershed.
  • Why Garden for Wildlife?

    K-12  |  Video
    This video from the National Wildlife Federation follows naturalist David Mizejewski as he discusses why it's important to plan gardens with wildlife in mind.
  • Why North Pole Web Cams?

    6-12  |  Video
    Deployment of a Web cam at North Pole in 2002 provided the very first summer-long view of conditions at the North Pole. Includes narration with background information about the North Pole and the Web cams.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: The Strength and Flexibility of Oscar Pistorius

    6-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius is the first double-amputee athlete to compete at the Olympics. He will race in the 400 meter race and 4x400 meter relay using a pair of carbon fiber prosthetic legs engineered to store and release energy from the impact of his strides.
  • Shape Memory Alloys

    9-12  |  Video
    Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, associate professor of mechanical engineering & materials science at Yale, talks about shape memory alloys. These "metals with a memory" are used in space, in robots, and even in your mouth!
  • Savage Yard Microbes Segment

    9-12  |  Video
    In this pilot segment, host Bob Hirshon speaks with microbiologist Betsey Dexter Dyer about some of the microscopic life in Bob's backyard—tiny organisms that make life possible for the big creatures like us.
  • Return of the Cicadas

    K-12  |  Video
    This time-lapse video takes a look at the 17-year life cycle of the magicicada.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Maximizing the Long Jump of Bryan Clay

    9-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. In order to maximize his performance, 2008 Olympic decathlon gold medalist Bryan Clay teamed up with engineers from BMW to improve measurement of the horizontal and vertical velocities of his long jumps.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Measuring a Champion

    6-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. An electrical engineer at Georgia Institute of Technology explains why Olympic timekeeping technology must be able to measure an athlete's performance with both accuracy and precision.
  • Quasicrystals

    9-12  |  Video
    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to quasicrystals. But what are they? Dr. Ainissa Ramirez guides us into this strange world where atoms arrange themselves in forbidden ways and create materials with weird properties.
  • Prepare for the Science Fair

    5-12  |  Video
    High school senior Kevin Temmer created this animated short on how to take part in a science fair as part of the International Baccalaureate program at Land O'Lakes High School.
  • Science of the Summer Olympics: Missy Franklin and Fluid Dynamics

    8-12  |  Video
    This video is from the "Science of the Summer Olympics" series, produced by NBC and the National Science Foundation. U.S. swimmer Missy Franklin masters the basic principles of fluid dynamics in order to be the fastest swimmer in the pool.
  • Plant Identification and Classification

    6-12  |  Video
    In this video, your students will gain an understanding of the processes of plant identification and why the discipline is important in scientific research.
  • Planetfall

    3-12  |  Video
    Michael Benson discusses the Planetfall art exhibition.
  • Space Shuttle Ceramics

    9-12  |  Video
    Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, associate professor of mechanical engineering & materials science at Yale, demonstrates the heat absorption properties of the space shuttle's ceramic tiles.
  • Solar Cells

    9-12  |  Video
    In this short video, Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, a Yale engineer, shows how sandwiches of silicon (in solar cells) can create energy from sunlight and help curb our dependence on oil.
  • Graphene

    9-12  |  Video
    Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, associate professor of mechanical engineering & materials science at Yale, discusses how a layer of carbon that is one atom thick, called graphene, will revolutionize our lives in this episode of Material Marvels.

AAAS Thinkfinity